Gender bias in job descriptions—where we stand now

Gender bias in job descriptions—where we stand now

In recent years, it has become clear that companies need to focus more on diversity and inclusion. People of all backgrounds, genders, and ages need to be equally represented in an organization. And they need to have equal opportunities when they apply for a job. Most companies seem to be aware of the urgency of the matter. Which is why most set themselves ambitious diversity and inclusion goals. But despite these efforts, we still see gender bias in recruitment. Especially when we look at job descriptions, a lot remains to be done. Most job ads still have a more masculine tone of voice. They appeal to men, and they discourage women from applying.

Gender bias in recruitment

Some progress has been made when we look at gender bias in recruitment. Companies seem to understand the importance of gender-neutral language. The number of job descriptions with a more masculine tone of voice seems to be decreasing. But not as fast as you would expect it to. There are still quite a lot of industries in which a more masculine tone of voice is common. This discourages women from applying, and as a result, you’ll receive more applications from men. That’s a real shame because a gender-neutral tone of voice can easily change this. Research shows that women are more sensitive to gender-specific language use. This means that writing gender-neutral job descriptions is definitely worth the effort. And it will lead to your company receiving more applications from women.

Use Textmetrics to write more gender-neutral job descriptions

A bias can be difficult to recognize. Therefore, it can also be difficult to avoid. Because what is a “more masculine” tone of voice? At Textmetrics, we offer a platform that helps you to remove gender bias from your job descriptions. It’s very easy to use. You just write your job description and our platform will analyze your words. Does your job ad have a more masculine tone of voice? Then you can use our suggestions to change this to a gender-neutral tone of voice. You’ll end up with a job description that will appeal to both men and women. Women won’t feel excluded any longer. And the number of female hires in your company will go up. An important step toward becoming a more diverse and inclusive company.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

The time to get started with employer branding is now

The time to get started with employer branding is now

Have you noticed that it is not as easy to recruit new employees as it was a decade ago? The reason for this is twofold. Currently, there just aren’t that many people who are looking for a new job. The number of jobseekers is lower than the number of vacancies. Secondly, you’re probably more focused on diversity and inclusion now than you were 10 years ago. You don’t just want to hire the best possible candidate. You also want to build a more diverse workforce. To attract employees when jobseekers are scarce, you need to position yourself as a company people want to work for. Employer branding helps you achieve this.

The necessity of employer branding

In the years to come, the battle for talent is only going to get more intense. That’s one reason why it’s important to act now. An aging population means you’ll probably have more positions to fill in the years to come. At the same time, the number of jobseekers won’t increase. Another reason to embrace employer branding now is your diversity and inclusion goals. You have probably noticed that these aren’t easy to reach. Employer branding can make a real difference here. Jobseekers are more likely to apply to companies with a strong employer brand.

How to build a strong employer brand

It’s obvious why now is the best time to get started on building your employer brand. But how do you get on with it? By following the three tips below:

  • Be authentic

When you’re building an employer brand, it’s very important to be authentic. How does your company distinguish itself from competitors? What do you have to offer? By being honest and authentic, you can build an employer brand that truly fits your organization.

  • Let your employees speak up 

The best ambassadors for your employer brand are the people who already work for you. Ask them tell stories about what it is like to work at your company.

  • Keep in touch with candidates 

When it comes to employer branding, communication is key. It’s important to keep in touch with candidates during the application process. If you fail to do so and leave them unhappy, they might leave a bad review online. That is the last thing you want.

Let Textmetrics give you a head start

To build a strong employer brand, you need to work on all of your written communication. That’s where the Textmetrics platform comes in. You can use it to analyze all of the content you publish. Should you deviate too far from your brand identity, the platform will give you real-time suggestions to change this. As a result, you’ll know that all of your written content is consistent with your employer brand. An important step in getting started with employer branding.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

How age bias (and many more) stands in the way of diversity

How age bias (and many more) stands in the way of diversity

Nowadays, diversity is all around us. We live amongst people of different backgrounds, genders, and ages. We know that diversity in the workforce helps organizations grow. On top of that, diverse teams also make better decisions. So, becoming a more diverse company should be a top priority, right? For many companies it is. But for some reason, reaching those diversity and inclusion goals isn’t as easy as many companies think. This is often due to the so-called unconscious bias, like age bias. Outside of our conscious awareness and control, we hold associations that stand in the way of increasing diversity. 

Examples of unconscious bias like age bias

Becoming a more diverse company requires a change of the organizational culture. Obviously, this doesn’t happen overnight. To create a culture where diversity and inclusion are embraced, unconscious bias needs to be eliminated. Here are some examples of unconscious bias that have to be dealt with:

Recruiters often think that hiring people older than 50 is a risk. They are more likely to fall ill, and they aren’t very flexible anymore. Flexible in terms of their willingness to learn new skills, adapt to new technologies, and ability to work shifts.

Women are less ambitious than men. Especially when they have children, women won’t want to work full time anymore. They will want to stay home more to care for their children.

  • Discrimination based on religion

Women who wear a headscarf are very compliant and less suitable for a leadership role.

  • Discrimination based of physical condition

People with an occupational disability require a lot of extra guidance and are less productive.

If recruiters, managers and other staff are afflicted with unconscious bias, it’s hard to increase diversity. Recruiters and managers often unconsciously hire people who are like them. They claim they want a more diverse team. But, unconscious bias prevents this from happening.

Prevent age bias and increase diversity by using Textmetrics

Increasing diversity in a company starts with the recruitment process. So, this is where the impact of unconscious bias needs to be eliminated first. The Textmetrics platform can be a big help here. It promotes inclusive writing. You can use it to write job descriptions that are free of any bias. Your job descriptions have a gender-neutral tone of voice and appeal to men and women alike. And to people of all ages. They have just the right tone of voice to reach everyone in your target group. Exactly what you need to increase diversity.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

Three examples of gender bias in the workplace

Three examples of gender bias in the workplace

Think about your workplace and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you employ as many women as you do men?
  • Do you have as many women in leadership roles as you do men?
  • Do men and women earn equal salaries for the same job?

If the answer to one or more of these questions is ‘no’, that is probably due to gender bias. This is often a form of unconscious or implicit bias. And women are mostly the ones who suffer as a result of it. Gender bias occurs when someone unconsciously attributes certain attitudes and stereotypes to someone. For example, men may be considered more analytical and less emotional. As a result, they have a better chance of being considered for a leadership role.

Gender bias in the workplace is always problematic. Not only because all people deserve equal treatment and chances. But also because gender bias stands in the way of becoming a more inclusive and diverse company.

Examples of gender bias

Gender bias in the workplace takes different forms. Let’s have a look at the three examples below.

1. Gender bias in job interviews

Gender bias starts even before the interview. Recruiters decide who to invite for interviews based on application letters. From research, we know that women get invited less. When they do get invited, they’re often set different interview tasks than men. Men are more frequently given math-based interview tests, while women are given more verbal tests. Women are also more likely to be asked about parental plans and responsibilities. Men rarely have to answer these kinds of questions.

2. Gender bias and the pay gap

The pay gap is real. Women still earn less than men for doing the same job. On average, women earn 17% less than their male colleagues. The differences vary per country. In the US, it’s 21.4%, in Canada, it’s 16.1%, in the UK, it’s 17.9%, and in the Netherlands, it’s 18.9%.

3. Gender bias in job descriptions

Gender bias in job descriptions is not uncommon either. We see a lot of words in job ads that mostly appeal to men. These are words that women don’t identify with. As a result of which, they will refrain from applying. Women want to meet 100% of the qualifications asked for. If they meet less than 100%, they won’t apply. For men, meeting around 60% of the qualifications is enough to apply. You should therefore only list the qualifications that are absolutely necessary for the job. 

No more gender bias in the workplace? Use Textmetrics!

Gender bias is unfortunately still very common and a real problem. Above are just three examples, but we could list many more. To become a more diverse and inclusive company, the gender bias problem has to be tackled. You can use the Textmetrics platform to take the first step. You can use it to eliminate gender bias from your job descriptions. And write job ads with a gender-neutral tone of voice that appeals to both men and women. As a result, more women will apply. And you can answer the first question we asked at the beginning with a ‘yes’.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

All you need to know about employer branding in recruitment

All you need to know about employer branding in recruitment

A term like employer branding isn’t automatically linked to recruitment. That’s quite strange, since it has everything to do with attracting and retaining the right employees for your company. Talented employees who are part of your target group.

Employer branding is all about positioning yourself as an employer of choice. Potential and current employees must see you as a company they want to work for (or keep working for). Building a strong employer brand plays an important role in this.

The importance of employer branding in recruitment

In recruitment, building a preferred position is important for a number of reasons. Firstly, it’s not that easy to find new employees at the moment. Talented people are scarce, and they have plenty of companies to choose from. How do you make sure they choose you? That’s right! By building a strong employer brand.

A strong employer brand also helps you reach your diversity and inclusion goals. Because in order to do so, you need to reach your entire target group. People from different backgrounds need to prefer you to other companies. For that, they need to know what makes you stand out from other employers.

How to build a strong employer brand

Employer branding is not just about communicating how great a company you are. You need to be a great company to work for. The best way to become a company like this is by asking your current employees about their experiences. You also need to answer the following question: how do you want to distinguish yourself from other companies? Do you want to position yourself as an ambitious organization striving to become a market leader? Or do you want to be the organization with the best working conditions and salary? The direction you choose also depends on the target group you’re aiming to attract.

Once decided, you need to communicate your employer brand to the world. A recruitment campaign is a good way to do this. Don’t forget about the recruitment page on your own website, either. It’s important to spread the same message across all available communication channels.

Build a strong employer brand using Textmetrics

To build a strong employer brand, you need to be consistent in the message that you spread. This requires work on all of your written communication. That’s where the Textmetrics platform can be of great use. It analyzes all of the content you publish. Do you deviate too far from your brand identity? Then the platform will give you real-time suggestions to stay on track. This means that all of your written content is consistent with your employer brand. 

Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

Guest note: Creating a job listing website has never been easier with Jobmate by Wbcom Designs – the easiest to use job board theme available.