What is gender bias in the workplace?

What is gender bias in the workplace?

Bias comes in many forms and can cause us to form prejudices against others. One of the biases we often see in the workplace is gender bias. It’s the tendency to prefer one gender over another. Often, it’s men that are preferred over women. This preference is not one we intentionally hold. Most of the time, we are not even aware of gender bias. We unconsciously attribute certain attitudes and stereotypes to a gender. For example, we might think that men are stronger and have better analytical skills. While women are more caring and better at expressing themselves. These prejudices can lead to inequality in the workplace. This is the last thing you want if you strive to be a diverse and inclusive company.

Examples of gender bias in the workplace

Gender bias is most prominently visible within the workplace. Here are some examples of gender bias manifesting itself in the professional field:

  • Recruitment strategies are biased

Both male and female recruiters are twice as likely to hire men. They also invite men to job interviews more often. Even if they receive applications from equally qualified women. Recruiters are also more likely to ask women about parental responsibilities, while male candidates rarely receive these questions.

  • The gender pay gap

In many countries and companies, it is still very common for women to get paid less than men. Even if they do the exact same job. Women are also less likely to obtain upper-level roles. The glass ceiling is still very hard to break through.

  • Women are interrupted more than men

In meetings and conversations, men interrupt women more than they do men. As a result, women are more likely to be dismissed. What women have to say may not be amplified as well as what men have to say.

  • Job descriptions are biased

Even job descriptions are the victim of unconscious gender bias. The language used in job descriptions often appeals more to men than it does to women. Words like confident, decisive, strong and outspoken can discourage women from applying. They don’t recognize themselves in what is being asked for, while men do.

Use Textmetrics to overcome gender bias in the workplace

Gender bias has no place in the workplace. Especially not when you wish to become more diverse and inclusive. Or when you have ambitious diversity and inclusion goals to reach. Textmetrics can help you take the first steps to overcome gender bias in the workplace. You can use our platform to eliminate bias from your job descriptions. The platform analyzes your content and gives you suggestions for a more gender-neutral tone of voice. And it gives you options for words that appeal to both men and women. You’ll end up with job ads that appeal to both genders. It’s an important first step towards hiring more women and having a more diverse workforce.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

The impact of gender bias in the workplace

The impact of gender bias in the workplace

When we discuss workplace discrimination, gender bias is one of those topics we can’t ignore. We’re sure that all companies want to treat men and women equally. Unfortunately, though, in practice, women often don’t benefit from the same opportunities. In many companies, there is still an unfair difference in the way employees are treated. This gender bias often happens unintentionally. It’s a preference or prejudice we hold toward one gender over another.

In companies, gender bias can show up in a number of ways. Perhaps managers favor their same-gender teammates. Or recruiters ask gendered questions in interviews. Often, women also get paid less than men for the same role.

How gender bias impacts the workplace

Gender bias is very common. Research in the US shows that almost half of all women surveyed have experienced gender discrimination in the workplace. We all know that there are far fewer women in leadership positions than there are men. And in some industries, it’s a challenge to find any women for roles at all. This gender bias has a very unwelcome impact on the workplace:

  • Over time, gender bias increases earning gaps and decreases the career prospects of women. It promotes the underrepresentation of women in leadership positions. Women also often receive less constructively critical feedback than men. This has an effect on their growth.
  • Men also suffer from gender bias if they stray too far from the strong masculine stereotype. When men in leadership positions ask for help, they are seen as less competent. And when they ask for parental leave, people see them as poorer workers.
  • Employees who don’t feel welcome and appreciated are more likely to leave. That’s why gender bias often leads to higher turnover rates amongst both women and men. In a time when talent is scarce, this is the last thing you’ll want. 

Overcoming gender bias using Textmetrics

When you value diversity and inclusion, gender bias has no place in your organization. To reach your diversity and inclusion goals, it’s something you have to overcome. It’s the only way to benefit from the advantages of gender diversity. Such as more innovation, creativity and productivity amongst staff. 

You can use the Textmetrics platform to write gender-neutral content. The platform analyzes your content and gives you suggestions for a more gender-neutral tone of voice. And it gives you options for words that appeal to both men and women. Should you use this for job descriptions? Then you’ll end up with job ads that appeal to both men and women. An important first step towards hiring more women and having a more balanced workforce.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

DEIB at work—ways to increase diversity and inclusion

DEIB at work—ways to increase diversity and inclusion

How diverse is your workforce? Are people from different backgrounds treated equally? Do they have the same chances? And do you hire people from different backgrounds for new jobs? Is the answer to all these questions “yes”? Then you probably have no problem reaching your diversity and inclusion goals. Unfortunately, we know that the most common answer is “no”. Diversity and inclusion are more relevant today than ever before. We even speak about DEIB now. This is short for diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging. And it is about improving equality and success even more. But how do you successfully implement diversity and inclusion in your workforce? We will tell you all about that here.

3 ways to increase DEIB

A company that embraces DEIB wants its workforce to resemble society. Everyone in the organization needs to feel heard. And everyone should have equal opportunities to grow. To increase diversity and inclusion in the workforce, you should:

1. Eliminate bias

Bias is probably the most important thing that stands in the way of increasing diversity and inclusion. A bias is a prejudice we hold for or against a person or group. We might, for example, think that people above a certain age are too old for a job. Or that women are less suitable for a job because a lot of analytical skills are required. These prejudices are often completely unconscious. We don’t intend to exclude people. But because it does happen often, it’s worth figuring out if there is bias in your workforce.

2. Implement an inclusive HR strategy

HR plays a very important role in becoming a more diverse and inclusive company. Therefore, you cannot do without an inclusive HR strategy. It needs to describe:

  • how you will hire people from different backgrounds;
  • how you will make sure that everyone has an equal opportunity when they apply;
  • how you can retain people from different backgrounds;
  • how you will ensure that they have equal opportunities to grow in the company.

3. Hire a chief diversity officer

If you wish to see results quickly, you can opt to hire a chief diversity officer. You hire one person who is responsible for all of your diversity and inclusion efforts. The chief diversity officer is responsible for increasing diversity and inclusion in the workforce. He or she creates a work culture where all employees can be productive. Where everyone feels respected and safe in their work environment.

Textmetrics and DEIB at work

At Textmetrics, we offer a platform you can use to embrace DEIB at work. And to increase diversity and inclusion in the workforce. How? By helping you to easily improve all written communication. You can use it to write job descriptions that are free of any bias. And job descriptions that appeal to everyone in your target group. But you can also use it to create content that you distribute amongst people who already work for you. Content that appeals to all ages, genders and backgrounds, and helps you create a culture of true belonging.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

Gender bias in job descriptions—where we stand now

Gender bias in job descriptions—where we stand now

In recent years, it has become clear that companies need to focus more on diversity and inclusion. People of all backgrounds, genders, and ages need to be equally represented in an organization. And they need to have equal opportunities when they apply for a job. Most companies seem to be aware of the urgency of the matter. Which is why most set themselves ambitious diversity and inclusion goals. But despite these efforts, we still see gender bias in recruitment. Especially when we look at job descriptions, a lot remains to be done. Most job ads still have a more masculine tone of voice. They appeal to men, and they discourage women from applying.

Gender bias in recruitment

Some progress has been made when we look at gender bias in recruitment. Companies seem to understand the importance of gender-neutral language. The number of job descriptions with a more masculine tone of voice seems to be decreasing. But not as fast as you would expect it to. There are still quite a lot of industries in which a more masculine tone of voice is common. This discourages women from applying, and as a result, you’ll receive more applications from men. That’s a real shame because a gender-neutral tone of voice can easily change this. Research shows that women are more sensitive to gender-specific language use. This means that writing gender-neutral job descriptions is definitely worth the effort. And it will lead to your company receiving more applications from women.

Use Textmetrics to write more gender-neutral job descriptions

A bias can be difficult to recognize. Therefore, it can also be difficult to avoid. Because what is a “more masculine” tone of voice? At Textmetrics, we offer a platform that helps you to remove gender bias from your job descriptions. It’s very easy to use. You just write your job description and our platform will analyze your words. Does your job ad have a more masculine tone of voice? Then you can use our suggestions to change this to a gender-neutral tone of voice. You’ll end up with a job description that will appeal to both men and women. Women won’t feel excluded any longer. And the number of female hires in your company will go up. An important step toward becoming a more diverse and inclusive company.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

The time to get started with employer branding is now

The time to get started with employer branding is now

Have you noticed that it is not as easy to recruit new employees as it was a decade ago? The reason for this is twofold. Currently, there just aren’t that many people who are looking for a new job. The number of jobseekers is lower than the number of vacancies. Secondly, you’re probably more focused on diversity and inclusion now than you were 10 years ago. You don’t just want to hire the best possible candidate. You also want to build a more diverse workforce. To attract employees when jobseekers are scarce, you need to position yourself as a company people want to work for. Employer branding helps you achieve this.

The necessity of employer branding

In the years to come, the battle for talent is only going to get more intense. That’s one reason why it’s important to act now. An aging population means you’ll probably have more positions to fill in the years to come. At the same time, the number of jobseekers won’t increase. Another reason to embrace employer branding now is your diversity and inclusion goals. You have probably noticed that these aren’t easy to reach. Employer branding can make a real difference here. Jobseekers are more likely to apply to companies with a strong employer brand.

How to build a strong employer brand

It’s obvious why now is the best time to get started on building your employer brand. But how do you get on with it? By following the three tips below:

  • Be authentic

When you’re building an employer brand, it’s very important to be authentic. How does your company distinguish itself from competitors? What do you have to offer? By being honest and authentic, you can build an employer brand that truly fits your organization.

  • Let your employees speak up 

The best ambassadors for your employer brand are the people who already work for you. Ask them tell stories about what it is like to work at your company.

  • Keep in touch with candidates 

When it comes to employer branding, communication is key. It’s important to keep in touch with candidates during the application process. If you fail to do so and leave them unhappy, they might leave a bad review online. That is the last thing you want.

Let Textmetrics give you a head start

To build a strong employer brand, you need to work on all of your written communication. That’s where the Textmetrics platform comes in. You can use it to analyze all of the content you publish. Should you deviate too far from your brand identity, the platform will give you real-time suggestions to change this. As a result, you’ll know that all of your written content is consistent with your employer brand. An important step in getting started with employer branding.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!