Eliminate age bias to improve culture and productivity

Eliminate age bias to improve culture and productivity

Do you treat older people the same as you do younger ones? For example, do you invite older people for interviews as often as their younger colleagues? Chances are, the honest answer is ‘no.’ The reason for this is age bias. It’s an unconscious bias or stereotype that we aren’t even aware of. Whether it’s fair or not, we often believe that it’s better to hire younger people. Biases are what our brain uses to help us make decisions more quickly. This almost makes you think that unconscious bias is a good thing. Unfortunately, the contrary is true. It can harm individuals and companies. 

The impact of age bias 

There are different unconscious biases, which all have a negative impact on how companies perform. The most significant damage age bias can do is: 

  • Lower productivity

Employees who experience bias in the workplace are nearly three times as likely to be disengaged at work. Do you stop discriminating against older—or in some cases younger—employees? Then you can seriously boost your company’s productivity. 

  • Reduce retention

Do older or younger employees perceive age bias? Then they are three times as likely to say that they plan to leave their job within a year. Retention is very important, especially in times when staff are scarce. Every good employee that leaves needs to be replaced. This takes a lot of effort and time. And you never know if you’ll be able to find someone who is equally skilled.  

  • Limit innovation 

Age bias also has a negative impact on innovation. When people feel discriminated against because of their age, they are 2.6 times less likely to share their ideas. That’s a shame because to innovate, you need everyone to contribute and share what they think. 

Use Textmetrics to eliminate age bias

Age bias is a form of unconscious bias that can be hard to recognize. It pays off to investigate whether it is an issue in your company. The consequences of age bias have quite a negative impact on a company. And you should try everything you can to eliminate it.

Textmetrics can be a big help here, especially when it comes to recruitment. Because candidates of all ages often refrain from applying if they perceive age bias in a job description.

You can use the Textmetrics platform to remove age bias from your job descriptions and all other content. The platform gives you suggestions while you’re writing. For example, words that discriminate against older people are highlighted. You can replace them with words that appeal to everyone. As a result, all your content will be free of age bias. And you’ll have taken a significant step towards eliminating age bias in your company. 

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

The role of humans in data-driven recruitment

The role of humans in data-driven recruitment

Has the rise of data-driven recruitment left you feeling worried? And are you afraid that recruiters’ jobs might soon be fully taken over by artificial intelligence? Then allow us to take all your worries away. Indeed, recruitment is an industry that is heavily impacted by technology. Let’s have a look at data-driven recruitment, for example. It’s an innovation that helps you analyze candidates to recruit people with the right skills and experience. But that doesn’t mean there is nothing left for recruiters to do.

Innovations based on artificial intelligence and machine learning are very helpful, but they cannot fully replace recruiters. To hire the right candidate for a job, you need more than just technology. But technology can be a great way to decrease a recruiters workload.

Humanization in data-driven recruitment

Data-driven recruitment is great for suggesting the best candidates for a job. It analyzes resumes and candidate profiles and chooses which candidates would be best suited to the job. This increases the chances of finding the best match. And it eliminates bias from the recruitment process. But what this technology can’t do is really get to know the candidate. Is the candidate really a perfect fit for the organization? And how about the negotiations when you want to hire someone? To get the best result for the candidate and the organization, human negotiations are needed.

The human touch is also much needed to improve the candidate experience. Recruiters have a major influence on how a candidate experiences the recruitment process. Data-driven recruitment can play a part by decreasing the length of the recruitment process. But it’s the recruiter who asks the candidate how they are doing. And who lets candidates know that they’ll get back to them. And then do so in a reasonable timeframe.

Lastly, recruiters play an important role once a candidate is hired. They are the ones responsible for retaining a candidate. In times like these when staff is scarce, this is very important. Employees need to feel engaged after they are onboarded. They need to feel heard and supported. And there needs to be enough opportunity for them to develop themselves.

Textmetrics and data-driven recruitment

Data-driven recruitment is a very helpful technology to use in the recruitment process. The use of this AI-driven innovation has many benefits. You can use it to recruit people with the right skills and experience. And it eliminates bias from the recruitment process. This is especially helpful when you are trying to build a more diverse workforce. But for it to achieve the best results, recruiters still have an important role to play.

That is certainly true for the Textmetrics platform. You can use it to implement data-driven recruitment in your hiring process. You can use the platform to read and analyze the job descriptions you write. And together with the platform, you can eliminate bias from these job descriptions. Your writing will also have a more gender-neutral tone of voice. As a result, your job ads will appeal to everyone in your target audience. Just what you need to diversify your workforce and hire the very best candidate for the job.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.

How to recognize age bias in the workplace

How to recognize age bias in the workplace

In the modern-day workplace, age bias is a thing of the past, right? People are all treated equally, no matter how young or old they are. Because that is what needs to be the case if you are striving to become a diverse company. And if you have set ambitious diversity and inclusion goals. Unfortunately, reality often differs from the image we just created. A lot of young and old workers still experience age bias in the workplace. Young workers might hear that they are “too young” for a certain job. While senior workers hear that a company is looking for someone with “a lot of energy”. Senior workers, in particular, have a lot of trouble finding a new job. Even in times when candidates are scarce. 

6 ways to recognize age bias

Age bias is a tricky thing. Often, managers and recruiters don’t realize that there is age bias in the workplace. It can go completely unnoticed, just like many other biases do. There are six ways to spot age bias in the workplace:

  • Opportunities to learn and grow are only offered to younger employees. Senior employees are excluded from courses, training programs and conferences.
  • Challenging assignments are only offered to younger employees. Routine, unpleasant and less challenging assignments are for the senior employees to take care of.
  • Senior employees don’t receive invites to client meetings or company activities.
  • Snide comments about someone’s age. These comments might seem to be subtle and playful, but people do mean what they say. Senior employees might need to listen to jokes about their slow typing and gasps for breath when taking the stairs.
  • Sometimes, someone’s age also has an influence on raises and promotions. Although hard to prove, young and older workers might receive these less often or not at all anymore.
  • Young and older applicants are not invited for a job interview based on the age on their resume. Young candidates are considered to have too little experience. Older candidates, on the other hand, are thought of as too experienced for the job.

Use Textmetrics to remove age bias in the workplace

Age bias is a form of discrimination and has no place in the workplace. Do you recognize hidden age bias in your company? Then it’s high time you put an end to it. Textmetrics can be a big help here, especially when it comes to recruitment. Because young or older candidates often refrain from applying because there is age bias in a job description.

You can use the Textmetrics platform to remove age bias from your job descriptions. The platform gives you suggestions while you’re writing. For example, words that discourage older candidates from applying are highlighted. You can replace these with words that appeal to everyone. As a result, your job descriptions will be free of age bias. And you’ll receive applications from people of all ages.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

Age bias —3 examples in recruitment and how to avoid it

Age bias —3 examples in recruitment and how to avoid it

Often, the labor market isn’t quite similar society. Some groups of people are underrepresented. Older workers are one of those groups. And age bias is responsible for this. In short, it means that companies—although often unintentionally—discriminate when it comes to the age of applicants. In recruitment, we see this happen very early on in the process. Job descriptions regularly discourage older people from applying. This happens in a number of different ways. It’s a real shame because older workers bring a lot of experience to your company. Diverse companies also perform better and are more innovative. All the more reason to remove age bias from the recruitment process.

3 examples of age bias in recruitment 

Age bias in recruitment starts with the job descriptions companies publish. There are a number of different ways age discrimination sneaks in here:

  • The language used

A lot of job descriptions contain words that older people don’t identify with. Think of words like energetic and vibrant. These might give older workers the impression that you are looking for someone younger. Try to use more neutral words instead. Words that appeal to people of all ages.

  • The experience asked

When it comes to experience, you should describe in neutral terms the kind of experience you’re looking for. Refrain from using numbers. Because listing a maximum number of years of experience will discourage older people from applying. They probably have a lot more experience than the 10 years you listed.

  • The necessary qualifications 

Be careful with the qualifications you list in your job description as well. Only list the qualifications that are absolutely necessary for the job. We often see graduates listed as a qualification. This might give older workers the impression the job is not meant for them.

Use Textmetrics to avoid age bias in recruitment

Above are three examples of age bias in job descriptions. In particular, the language used can be a challenge to get right. Because what are age-neutral words, so to speak? At Textmetrics, we offer a platform that can help you to eliminate age bias from your job descriptions. It’s very easy to use. The platform gives you suggestions while you’re writing. For example, words that discourage older candidates from applying are highlighted. You can replace these with words that appeal to everyone. These alternatives are suggested to prevent any form of discrimination. As a result, your job descriptions will be free of age bias. And you’ll receive applications from people of all ages.

Want to try Textmetrics? Click here for a free trial!

Avoid writing mistakes with an augmented writing platform

Avoid writing mistakes with an augmented writing platform

Have you spent a lot of your time in recent years on diversity and inclusion? Then you’ve probably noticed how difficult it is to achieve your diversity and inclusion goals. An important reason for this difficulty is the language you use for the written content you publish. Job ads, newsletters, and blog posts—you write them with the intention to reach as many people as possible. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done. We often stumble over the same writing mistakes. Luckily, these mistakes can be prevented by using an augmented writing platform. Discover all there is to know about this below.

Inclusive writing with an augmented writing platform

You want to reach everyone in your target group with the content you write. And you don’t want to exclude anyone. Inclusive writing is key. If you follow the rules for inclusive writing below, your diversity and inclusion goals become a lot easier to reach. 

  • Write in a human-centered, gender-neutral way, rather than using only he/she.
  • Address the reader directly, using “you”.
  • Do not discriminate based on age or gender.
  • Avoid stereotypical words and/or associations. You use these more often than you think. Pink for women, blue for men, for example.
  • Apply the WCAG guidelines.

Three common writing mistakes

When it comes to inclusive writing, there are three common writing mistakes many of us make.

  • The language level is too difficult for everyone to understand

A lot of the written content companies publish is too difficult for most people. The language level exceeds level B1, which is the language level that most people understand. To write at language level B1, you should:

  • Use words that everyone knows.
  • Write short sentences that are easy to read.
  • Use bullet points and keep paragraphs short.
  • Use clear headings and subheadings.
  • There is bias in the content you write

Unfortunately, bias is very common. Written content frequently has a more masculine tone of voice (gender bias). This means that women don’t feel spoken to when they read it. Age bias is also very common. Especially in job ads, where older people often feel that they are encouraged not to apply.

  • The content is not accessible to everyone

Most of the content you write is published online. Approximately 25% of all internet users have a disability. These internet users might have difficulty hearing, suffer from limited eyesight, or are sensitive to light. For these people, it’s important to ensure that digital accessibility is taken care of. That’s the only way to reach everyone in your target group.

Textmetrics – your augmented writing platform

It’s clear why avoiding the three writing mistakes above is important. Inclusive writing, however, is not as easy as it might sound. There are a lot of things that you need to consider. Luckily, there is such a thing as an augmented writing platform. This can best be described as a technology that serves as a writing coach. It makes implementing the rules for inclusive writing a lot easier. 

The Textmetrics platform is an augmented writing platform that gives you suggestions on:

  • The right tone of voice for your content.
  • How to avoid bias.
  • How to write at language level B1.
  • How to avoid words that are too difficult for your target group.

​​Want to know more about our Smart Writing Assistant? Click here.